Japanese Lesson from Games: Use them with your chin (?!)

The Nintendo Switch is region free, and many (not all) games, including Octopath Traveler, have the full Japanese text and audio available in the U.S. release of the game. No need to import from Japan! This is an amazing resource for gamers who are learning Japanese. Here’s my latest grab!

ago de tsukau kurai no
ago de tsukau kurai no ooakindo ni natteru ze!

The phrase I want to highlight in this post is あごで使う and it literally means, “to use (someone) by the chin.” Pretty hard to understand this phrase from the words alone!

The character on the right in this scene is Teresa, a merchant. Before this point in the game she met this merchant boy and they had gotten into a selling war… and more. No spoilers, but Teresa comes out on top.

Later, the merchant boy on the left is saying to Teresa that when they finally meet again, he will have improved his craft so much that he will be the one calling the shots and telling Teresa what to do.

Japanese: 顎で使う

Hiragana: あごでつかう

Romaji: ago de tsukau

ago de tsukawarerunoha docchi kashirane
ago de tsukawareru no ha docchi kashira ne

She’s confident and responds, hrm… I wonder which of us will be the one to be calling the shots… You’ll notice the passive form of the verb “to use” as tsukawareru. The “kashira” at the end is the sentence ending particle, usually feminine, to express a question, often to one’s self. More on kashira here on Tae Kim’s Guide.

Check my Twitter account @Japannewbie for more occasional Japanese language tidbits from games.

My First HeroForge Miniature for D&D Gaming

I started playing Dungeons and Dragons for the first time since high school this past summer. Our group has become fairly serious, and people started buying miniatures, so I jumped on the bandwagon during a Black Friday sale.

HeroForge Mini in Steel 1
Hero Forge Mini in Steel

HeroForge is the place (or a place?) to go for minis. Alternatively you can use HeroForge to design your mini and buy the digital file, and then send the file to Shapeways to have it 3D printed and mailed to you. As of writing, you can save a bit of money this way.

HeroForge minis are available in several materials ranging from cheap plastic to freakin’ shiny bronze. There are many stories on Reddit r/HeroForgeMinis about people ordering figures in the cheapest plastic and having them arrive broken, or breaking after being dropped one foot to the ground. To avoid that hassle, I decided to order mine in steel. It’s pricey, but hey, steel should last pretty much forever right? Right???

I’m not the type to collect things, so I designed a somewhat generic magic user that I suspect I should be able to use to represent a variety of warlocks, mages, and sorcerers. Right now I play a warlock.

Here he is! (Again.)

HeroForge Mini in Steel 3
Hero Forge Mini in Steel Side View
HeroForge Mini in Steel 2
Hero Forge Mini in Steel Back View (Kid’s Hand for Scale?)

Shipping was fine. As you can see, he came in a box that’s gotta be 20 times the size of the figure. He was wrapped in plenty of bubble packing material, and the figure was inside of a nice small ziplock baggie. Even though the box was pretty banged up upon arrival the figure was completely fine.

HeroForge Mini in Steel 4
Hero Forge Mini in Steel and Relatively Massive Box

I’ll attempt to paint this guy at some point, but wow, it’s so small! That’s going to be tough, but probably entertaining.

Can’t wait to get him on the table during our D&D games!

Also, this just in, Full-Color Miniatures coming to HeroForge!

Japanese Lesson from Games: Nobody on the Right

Fire Emblem Three Houses is FILLED with advanced Japanese phrases and vocabulary. The game is entirely voiced, and you can replay any dialog you want as long as you don’t leave the dialog sequence. The Nintendo Switch is region free, and many (not all) games, including Fire Emblem, have the full Japanese text and audio available in the U.S. release of the game. No need to import from Japan! This is an amazing resource for gamers who are learning Japanese. Here’s my latest grab!

Fire Emblem Vocab - Migi ni Deru
migi ni deru mono ha inai yo na

Japanese: 右に出る者はいない

Hiragana: みぎにでるものはいない

Romaji: migi ni deru mono ha inai

Literal Meaning: No one comes to your/his/her right.

This expression is used to indicate that someone is top of their class, a master of their profession. When lined up in order of skill, no one will be placed ahead of them.

Apparently, back in the day, it was typical for formal Japanese settings to be arranged so that people of higher rank, or more seniority, would be positioned on the right.

I tweeted this as well! Check my Twitter account @Japannewbie for more occasional Japanese language tidbits from games.

Japanese Lesson from Games: Water in My Ear

Fire Emblem Three Houses is FILLED with advanced Japanese phrases and vocabulary. The game is entirely voiced, and you can replay any dialog you want as long as you don’t leave the dialog sequence. The Nintendo Switch is region free, and many (not all) games, including Fire Emblem, have the full Japanese text and audio available in the U.S. release of the game. No need to import from Japan! This is an amazing resource for gamers who are learning Japanese. Here’s my latest grab!

Fire Emblem Vocab - Nemimi ni Mizu

Japanese: 寝耳に水 

Hiragana: ねみみにみず 

Romaji: nemimi ni mizu.

Literal meaning: Like water into a sleeping ear. Surprising. Like a bolt from the blue.

I tweeted this as well! Check my Twitter account @Japannewbie for more occasional Japanese language tidbits from games.