Love this Zelda Boss Key Charm from Fandom Regalia – The Best Gamer Swag

Fandom Regalia is a company in Toronto that makes high-quality jewelry around geek themes ranging from Mario to Star Trek. I have started a small collection of sterling silver charms for my keychain. The stuff at Fandom Regalia is mainly meant for necklaces, but I’ll do me you do you.

Keychain
Added some bling to my keychain.

They have many attractive items. As someone who likes video games in particular, I was interested in the Mario Mushroom, the Zelda Boss Key, and the Mario Boo. I ended up going with the Large Zelda Boss Key, mainly because it is a larger size, and it is double-sided while many of the other designs have a flat back. It’s also one of those icons where, if ya know ya know — while if you don’t know, it still looks interesting.

Boss Key!

Ordering was easy and shipping was quick. When arrived it was more detailed than I had imagined. It was also smaller than I imagined, but that’s just silly because the measurements are on the website, and I checked them against a ruler before I ordered. Rest assured it’s sized as documented! The other charms that I have on my keychain are all larger, so it just looks small in comparison. If a double-sized XL Boss Key were ever created, I think I would jump on that.

Check out their stuff, might be fun!

Fandom Regalia on Facebook, and on their official website.

post

Der Clou: Roll & Heist – A Print and Play Board Game

Der Clou: Roll & Heist is a solo or cooperative print and play roll and write board game. That was a mouthful. All you need to play is to print out a few files, a pencil, and three six-sided dice.

A snapshot of part of one of the character sheets

BoardGameGeek.com rates this game highly. It’s definitely worth a look, especially since it’s free!

To put it simply, in this game you will find yourself rolling dice, and deciding how to use the values to carry out a heist. Get as much loot as you can to maximize your score before you run out of time and set off the alarms. There are different characters and character sheets, and different scenarios which adds to the replayability.

Here’s a thorough review by someone who has played the game several times.

Ready to give it a try? Head over to the official English page for Der Clou: Roll & Heist or BoardGameGeek site to download the files you need, print, and play!

Here’s some videos featuring Der Clou: Roll & Heist.

If you’re looking for another print and play board game that is just a little less involved, try Raging Bulls that I blogged about before. It’s a solid game!

post

Japanese Lesson from Games: 図太い bold

Fire Emblem Three Houses - Zubutoi
sasuga wa sensei, zubutoi ne

Japanese: 流石は先生、図太いね。

Hiragana:さすがはせんせい、ずぶといね。

Romaji: sasuga wa sensei, zubutoi ne.

Meaning: Bold, shameless, cheeky, brash.

I did not know the term zubutoi before encountering it here. This term can be used to both praise and criticize. It refers to someone who is bold and self-confident in their actions, not caring too much about what others may think of them. This person remains calm, cool, and collected, thus you’ll often see the word 平然 (heizen) used in the definition of zubutoi. You can probably understand why this could be taken in a negative sense in Japan, where society often drives individuals to think about how their actions might be taken by the entire group.

Fire Emblem Three Houses is FILLED with advanced Japanese phrases and vocabulary. The game is entirely voiced, and you can replay any dialog you want as long as you don’t leave the dialog sequence. The Nintendo Switch is region free, and many (not all) games, including Fire Emblem, have the full Japanese text and audio available in the U.S. release of the game. No need to import from Japan! This is an amazing resource for gamers who are learning Japanese. Look forward to more. This game is the gift that keeps on giving.

Japanese Lesson from Games: 顔が真っ青だ

The Nintendo Switch is region free, and many (not all) games, including the demo for Project Triangle Strategy, have the full Japanese text and audio available in the U.S. release of the game. This is an amazing resource for gamers who are learning Japanese. Here’s my latest grab!

Triangle Strategy - Kao ga Massao
doushita. kao ga massao dazo, Benedict.

Japanese: どうした。顔が真っ青だぞ、ベネディクト。

Romaji: doushita. kao ga massao dazo, benedikuto.

English: What’s wrong? Benedict, Your face is completely pale!

This is pretty self explanatory, but the interesting phrase I wanted to highlight is 顔が真っ青だぞ. 顔 (kao) is face. 真っ青 (massao) means “completely blue” literally. だぞ is for emphasis. Translated, 顔が真っ青だ is used to describe someone’s face when all the blood has drained from it.

Why blue? I don’t have a good answer. But if you think about it… In English we may someone looks “white as a sheet.” But, do people really look that color when the blood has drained from their face when they are sick or suddenly surprised? If you look closely, it’s probably more of a pale blue color. This is where the Japanese term comes from.

And while we’re on the Project Triangle Strategy subject. Did everyone try this demo? Tactics Ogre was one of the first Famicom games I imported, so this is nostalgia right up my alley. I also like Fire Emblem, SMT: Devil Survivor, and Advance Wars in terms of turn-based strategy games. Right up my alley. The demo had far too much dialog, especially after it opened with a warning from the publisher that it may be difficult to follow the story as they are dropping you in partway though… But the game mechanics appear to be solid. Spell effects that change the terrain properties, bonus damage based on positioning, support attacks from nearby teammates — excite! And so much Japanese voice acting!

I sure hope this game is great when it is finally release!

Here’s a random scene on topic!

ほたるんの顔が真っ青で汗がだらだら流れるシーン【のんのんびよりのんすとっぷ5話
post

Japanese Lesson from Games: 難攻不落

Fire Emblem Three Houses - Nankou Furaku
ima ya ano yousai wa nankoufuraku da

Japanese: 難攻不落

Hiragana: なんこうふらく

Romaji: nankou furaku

Literal Meaning: Difficult to attack, won’t fall.

The entire sentence here is 今やあの要塞は難攻不落だ。

要塞 (ようさい) means fortress.

今や well, 今 (いま) means now. The extra particle や is for emphasis, and a smaller nuance that I won’t get into here.

So here Claude is saying, “Now that fortress is impenetrable.” Tough to attack, impossible to topple.

Initial searches for this term online mostly resulted in websites explaining what the term means… I did find this Japanese manga that has the term right in the title though. It’s called 難攻不落の魔王城へようこそ and it’s on Amazon.jp.

Fire Emblem Three Houses is FILLED with advanced Japanese phrases and vocabulary. The game is entirely voiced, and you can replay any dialog you want as long as you don’t leave the dialog sequence. The Nintendo Switch is region free, and many (not all) games, including Fire Emblem, have the full Japanese text and audio available in the U.S. release of the game. No need to import from Japan! This is an amazing resource for gamers who are learning Japanese. Look forward to more. This game is the gift that keeps on giving.

Nintendo Switch Setup Tip – Opt out of Google Analytics

By default the Nintendo Switch eShop shares your data with Google Analytics. If you don’t want to feed your activity to “Big Data” you can change your settings with a few easy steps.

On your Switch go to the eShop.

Select your profile icon that is on the top right.

In your profile section you’ll see Available Funds and whatnot. From there, scroll all the way down to the bottom and you will see the Google Analytics Preferences.

Just click the Button that says Change, and on the next screen select the Radio Button that says “Don’t Share.”

That’s it! Note, if you are also on the Japanese eShop, the option is there too.

Here’s some other news on the same topic:

PSA: By Default, Nintendo Now Collects Data Through Google Analytics On Switch eShop (North America) [Nintendo Life] https://www.nintendolife.com/news/2020/12/psa_by_default_nintendo_now_collects_data_through_google_analytics_on_switch_eshop_north_america

post

Japanese Lesson from Games: 損切り

The Nintendo Switch is region free, and many (not all) games, including Octopath Traveler, have the full Japanese text and audio available in the U.S. release of the game. No need to import from Japan! This is an amazing resource for gamers who are learning Japanese. Here’s my latest grab!

Octopath Traveler - Songiri
songiri tte yatsu yo. shitteru yone?

Kanji: 損切り

Hiragana: そんぎり

Romaji: songiri

English: To cut your losses.

Teresa scolds, 「損切りってやつよ、知ってるよね?」songiri tte yatsu yo. shitteru yone? This phrase means, “It’s about cutting your loses, you know that right?”

They key phrase itself should be somewhat easy to internalize, even though I don’t think I had heard it before seeing it in this game. The first character means 損 (そん) “loss.” 損する is the verb form and literally means to “lose” in the sense of profit and loss, not to lose a competition (負ける) and not in the sense of misplacing and object (なくす). The second character means “cut,” so the characters point to the “cut loss” meaning directly.

The grammar immediately following is very informal, as is the entire speech bubble. Our hero says, 損切りってやつよ.

ってやつ is a very informal way of saying ということ. She’s saying, that she’s talking about the thing called “cutting your losses.” She then follows by saying, 知ってるよね, you know that right? It should be a snarky tone, translated something like… “It’s called ‘cutting your losses.’ You have heard of that concept… right?” So sassy!

I tweeted this as well! Check my Twitter account @Japannewbie for more occasional Japanese language tidbits from games.

Japanese Lesson from Games: たまげた

The Nintendo Switch is region free, and many (not all) games, including Octopath Traveler, have the full Japanese text and audio available in the U.S. release of the game. No need to import from Japan! This is an amazing resource for gamers who are learning Japanese. Here’s my latest grab!

Octopath Traveler Screenshot - Tamageta
tamageta… koitsu wa shourai, oomono ni naru zo

Kanji: 魂消た (The kanji doesn’t seem to be that commonly used, and it wasn’t in the game.)

Hiragana: たまげた

Romaji: tamageta

English: To be astonished, startled.

I don’t think I had learned the phrase たまげた before… It’s funny. I like it. The Kanji doesn’t seem to be commonly used, but it literally means that your spirit vanished or disappeared.

The Japanese website GOGEN explains that the expression has been around since the Meiji Era and means to have such a surprising experience that your spirit disappears. It also says that now there is also another expression, 魂切る (tamagiru), which currently has the same meaning, but wasn’t always that way.

I tweeted this as well! Check my Twitter account @Japannewbie for more occasional Japanese language tidbits from games.

post

Japanese Lesson from Games: 取捨選択

The Nintendo Switch is region free, and many (not all) games, including Octopath Traveler, have the full Japanese text and audio available in the U.S. release of the game. No need to import from Japan! This is an amazing resource for gamers who are learning Japanese. Here’s my latest grab!

Octopath Traveler Screenshot - Decision to accept or reject
jinsei wa shusha sentaku no renzoku da

Kanji: 取捨選択

Hiragana: しゅしゃせんたく

Romaji: Shusha Sentaku

English: Choices. Decision to accept or reject.

Rough literal translation: Life is a continuous string of decisions on what to accept and what to reject. I suspect the actual in game translation is something like, “Life is nothing but a series of choices…”

The phrase that I didn’t know until encountering it in this game is 取捨選択 shusha sentaku. This is one of those phrases where if you know the individual characters, you can pretty much guess the meaning of the phrase.

The first character 取 means “to take,” and the second character 捨 means to “throw away” and is common in the verb 捨てる. The next two characters make up a common vocabulary of 選択 which means to chose, make a selection, or choice.

All together 取捨選択 means to make a decision as to whether to accept or reject something.

I tweeted this as well! Check my Twitter account @Japannewbie for more occasional Japanese language tidbits from games.

How-to Transfer Nintendo Switch data to a larger microSD Card on MacOSX – It can be a Nightmare!

My Nintendo Switch microSD card filled up and I needed to move to a larger card. This would all be so much easier in Windows (see Nintendo’s official guidance). But I have Macs.

This method worked for me when moving data from a 128 GB microSD card to a 256 GB microSD card on Nintendo Switch Firmware 10.2 0.

Get the Old microSD Card Out of your Switch

Power off your Nintendo Switch. Not sleep, power it off.

Remove the microSD card. (The microSD card is located under the kickstand on the standard Nintendo Switch.)

Copy the contents of your old microSD card onto your Mac

Insert the microSD card into your Mac using whatever means works for you.

Launch the Terminal App and enter the following commands. A description of what the commands do follows.

mkdir ~/Desktop/MyOldSwitchMicroSDCard
cp -r /Volumes/Untitled/Nintendo ~/Desktop/MyOldSwitchMicroSDCard

The mkdir command is Make Directory, and it will create a directory on your desktop called MyOldSwitchMicroSDCard. You can change this directory name to whatever you want.

The cp -r command is Copy Recursively. This will copy everything from the Nintendo directory and its subdirectories on the old SD card, which by default mounts as /Volumes/Untitled/, to the MyOldSwitchMicroSDCard directory on your desktop.

Depending on the amount of data to be transferred and the speed of your gear this cp command may take hours to complete. Sit tight.

Setup the New microSD Card
You can perform this step while copying the old microSD card to your Mac.

Here’s how to format a microSD card with your Switch.
Ensure your Switch is powered off.
Insert the microSD card into your Switch.
Power on your Switch.
Select “Settings” form the home screen.
Select “System” from the settings menu.
Select Formatting Options.
Select Format microSD Card. Be careful to chose the right option here!
Continue.

This will wipe the microSD card and make it ready for use in the Nintendo Switch.

Now that your new microSD card is ready, it’s time to copy the content from your old microSD card on to it.

Copy the contents of your old microSD card from the Desktop onto your New microSD Card

Launch the Terminal App and enter the following commands to copy the content from your Desktop back to the microSD card.

cp -r ~/Desktop/MyOldSwitchMicroSDCard/Nintendo/* /Volumes/Untitled/Nintendo

Eject the card.

Put it in the new switch. Cross your fingers.

Press power.

After going through these steps, I noticed that all my games and save data seemed to be in tact. However, I was missing a bunch of photos and videos from the Album. No!!!! Not my Monster Hunter Ultimate kill screens and beautiful Zelda Breath of the Wild selfies!

To get the Album back, I tried running the the following commands from the reddit post in the Terminal App.

    sudo chflags -R arch /Volumes/Untitled/
    sudo chflags -R noarch /Volumes/Untitled/Nintendo/
    sudo mdutil -i off /Volumes/Untitled/
    sudo mdutil -E /Volumes/Untitled/
    dot_clean -m /Volumes/Untitled/

Not all of the commands executed successfully.

The first command failed with “.Spotlight-V100: Operation not permitted”.

The second command ran cleanly with no feedback.

The third command ran and returned with feedback finally saying “Indexing disabled.”

The fourth command also returned “Indexing disabled.” The final command failed saying, “Failed trying to change dir to .Spotlight-V100 Bad Pathname: Operation not permitted.

After running these commands, I could see everything I remember from my Album, however, now none of my non-cartridge games would launch. I would get an error message telling me to return Home and to try launching again.

Reading around I learned that one of the issues with Mac and Nintendo is that the Nintendo Switch does not play nicely with hidden directories and files that MacOS tends to put in its file structures. The hidden directories and files always have a dot at the beginning of the name. Like “.Spotlight-V100”.

Browsing the microSD card with Finder, and then hitting the Command+Shift+. keys together shows any hidden folders or files. Sure enough, I could now see the .Spotlight-V100 folder that was mentioned in the error messages above. I deleted that and emptied the recycle bin.

I reinserted the memory card into the Nintendo Switch, and now everything finally seems to be working!

Good luck! If you can avoid it, just do this on a Windows machine. I have also heard that if you don’t care about your Album contents, it may just be easier to swap memory cards and download everything again from the Nintendo eShop.

Whatever you decide to do, I hope it goes smoothly and that it doesn’t cost you much game time!

These tutorials were helpful!
FlynsArmy.com – https://www.flynsarmy.com/2019/07/how-to-transfer-data-between-nintendo-switch-microsd-cards-with-os-x/

Reddit.com How to transfer SD card data using MacOSX.

Reddit.com mentions using Command+Shift+. to show hidden files in Finder.

MacWorld on what those hidden folders are all about.